The orphanage in figures

Equipe éducative de l'orphelinat Shanti Bhavan Children's Home

Today, the orphanage houses 56 children aged between 3 and 21 years old.

They are spread across 3 houses: one for girls, one for boys 13 years old and under, and one for boys 14 years old and over.

The education team is comprised of volunteers from many different countries (France, USA, Ireland, Austria, Mexico, South Korea, New Zealand, Croatia) and local employees who receive a salary.

This year, the education team numbers 4 volunteers and 13 employees, comprised of 3 specialist teachers, 1 education advisor, 1 nurse, 1 accountant, 2 cooks, 1 driver, and 4 teachers who will provide school support on a part-time basis.

The annual budget for each child totals around 1 540 €.  

The main areas of expenditure are food, education, and employee salaries.

Costs INR Euros
Education (school supplies) ₹ 1 867 600 26 000 €
Food ₹ 1 510 900 21 034 €
Salaries ₹ 616 300 8 580 €
Healthcare ₹ 405 610 5 647 €
Clothing ₹ 125 000 1 740 €
Energy, office supplies, computer, telephone ₹ 200 000 2 784 €
Building and vehicle maintenance ₹ 643 200 8 954 €
Upkeep of land and garden ₹ 200 000 2 784 €
Leisure activities ₹ 139 700 1 945 €
Cleaning and hygiene products ₹ 267 000 3 717 €
Transport ₹ 356 700 4 966 €
TOTAL COSTS ₹ 6 188 410 86 154 €

To provide for our needs, the Shanthi Bhavan Children’s Home is the recipient of a number of different sources of revenue :

IN THE USA :
the International Foundation for Hope (IFH) gives the Home an average annual sum of 20 000 USD.

This foundation was started in Texas by Carol Collins, who for seven years worked with exemplary commitment at the heart of the SBCH.

IN INDIA :
Since 2013, the orphanage has also received government support. Officially the grant they provide should total 34 000 € a year.

But in reality the Indian department of health provides varied and seemingly random amounts: in 2013 we received a sum of 9000 €; in 2014 we received 15000 €, which averages 14% of our annual budget.

The grant we receive from the government essentially goes on paying the salaries of our social workers.